Dorothy Allison

  • Un ouvrage inédit de l'autrice du formidable recueil intitulé «Peau». Dans ce court texte éloquent et poignant, Dorothy Allison revient sur son enfance marquée par un climat de violence en Caroline du Sud, mais surtout sur les femmes qui l'ont entourée et guidée dans sa trajectoire, elle qui fut la première femme de sa famille à rejoindre l'université. Illustré de photos de la famille de Dorothy Allison, cet ouvrage rappelle la démarche d'Annie Ernaux dans «Retour à Yvetot» et souligne à quel point les petites histoires d'une génération contribuent à créer une légende pour les suivantes.

  • Dans ce recueil de 24 essais, Dorothy Allison raconte son enfance, son engagement féministe, sa sexualité et les «Sex Wars» des années 1980. Elle y aborde notamment les thèmes de l'inceste et de la lesbophobie, et partage ses réflexions sur la littérature : comment écrire l'extrême misère sociale, comment écrire sur le sexe ? Un livre tout à la fois intime, décapant et profondément politique. Cette réédition propose l'intégralité du recueil de Dorothy Allison, soit 7 textes inédits en français.

  • En Caroline du Sud, les étés sont étouffants. Les soirées se passent sur la véranda, à boire du thé glacé et à raconter des histoires. Ruth Anne Boatwright, surnommée Bone par sa famille et estampillée « bâtarde » par le comté de Greenville, se souvient. Elle revoit sa grand-mère édentée, impertinente, ses tantes farouches, usées par leurs grossesses, ses oncles violents, ivrognes pris au piège de leur misère. Elle se souvient de l'amour qu'elle portait à sa mère et de la haine grandissante qu'elle éprouvait pour son beau-père. Elle se souvient et elle raconte, avec une brutale sincérité, les aspirations d'une petite fille, la violence insoutenable, l'amour obstiné. Ce premier roman largement autobiographique, écrit pour exorciser cette enfance brûlée, a été finaliste pour le National Book Award en 1992.
    « Dorothy Allison sonne le retour de la littérature sociale aux États-Unis. Elle est devenue l'écrivain de l'Autre Amérique : celle des Blancs déshérités qui n'ont aucun espoir, aucune croyance, aucun avenir. Avec une force incroyable, Dorothy Allison décrit ce vide et cette violence. »Bernard Géniès, Le Nouvel Observateur

  • Twentieth Anniversary Edition - with a new introduction by the author'About as close to flawless as any reader could ask for' The New York Times Book Review
    Carolina in the 1950s, and Bone - christened Ruth Anna Boatwright - lives a happy life, in and out of her aunt's houses, playing with her cousins on the porch, sipping ice tea, loving her little sister Reece and her beautiful young mother. But Glen Waddell has been watching them all, wanting her mother too, and when he promises a new life for the family, her mother gratefully accepts. Soon Bone finds herself in a different, terrible world, living in fear, and an exile from everything she knows. Bastard Out of Carolina is a raw, poignant tale of fury, power, love and family.'For anyone who has ever felt the contempt of a self-righteous world, this book will resonate within you like a gospel choir. For anyone who hasn't, this book will be an education' Barbara KingsolverDorothy Allison was awarded the 2007 Robert Penn Warren Award for Fiction, and has been likened to Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner and Harper Lee.

  • Bastard Out of Carolina, nominated for the 1992 National Book Award for fiction, introduced Dorothy Allison as one of the most passionate and gifted writers of her generation. Now, in Two or Three Things I Know for Sure, she takes a probing look at her family's history to give us a lyrical, complex memoir that explores how the gossip of one generation can become legends for the next.

    Illustrated with photographs from the author's personal collection, Two or Three Things I Know for Sure tells the story of the Gibson women -- sisters, cousins, daughters, and aunts -- and the men who loved them, often abused them, and, nonetheless, shared their destinies. With luminous clarity, Allison explores how desire surprises and what power feels like to a young girl as she confronts abuse.

    As always, Dorothy Allison is provocative, confrontational, and brutally honest. Two or Three Things I Know for Sure, steeped in the hard-won wisdom of experience, expresses the strength of her unique vision with beauty and eloquence.

  • Retour à Cayro

    Dorothy Allison

    • Belfond
    • 2 Juin 2016

    Aux États-Unis, dans les années 1990 Delia Byrd a fui un mari violent et dangereux pour suivre Randall Pritchard et son groupe de rock, abandonnant du même coup ses deux petites filles, Amanda et Dede.
    Dix ans ont passé, mais ni le succès, ni les frissons de la scène, ni la naissance de Cissy, sa troisième fille, n'ont réussi à guérir ses blessures ou à apaiser sa culpabilité. L'alcool l'a presque détruite et l'amour l'a déçue une seconde fois.
    Quand Randall meurt dans un accident de moto, Delia décide de quitter la Californie et de rentrer chez elle, en Géorgie. Sa vieille voiture chargée de tout ce qu'elle possède, une Cissy murée dans un silence hostile à l'arrière, elle traverse d'une traite le pays, persuadée que son salut passe par un retour à Cayro, sa ville natale. Récupérer ses filles deviendra son obsession, plus forte que la haine que lui voue Cissy, que la rancoeur de Dede et d'Amanda, que la dureté des habitants de Cayro, des gens du Sud, austères et pétris de religion, déterminés à lui faire payer sa rédemption au prix fort.

  • En Caroline du Sud, les étés sont étouffants. Les soirées se passent sur la véranda, à boire du thé glacé et à raconter des histoires. Ruth Anne Boatwright, surnommée Bone par sa famille et estampillée « bâtarde » par le comté de Greenville, se souvient. Elle revoit sa grand-mère édentée, impertinente, ses tantes farouches, usées par leurs grossesses, ses oncles violents, ivrognes pris au piège de leur misère. Elle se souvient de l'amour qu'elle portait à sa mère et de la haine grandissante qu'elle éprouvait pour son beau-père. Elle se souvient et elle raconte, avec une brutale sincérité, les aspirations d'une petite fille, la violence insoutenable, l'amour obstiné. Ce premier roman largement autobiographique, écrit pour exorciser cette enfance brûlée, a été finaliste pour le National Book Award en 1992.

  • The modern literary classic that has been compared to To Kill a Mockingbird and Catcher in the Rye.
    "As close to flawless as any reader could ask for."
    -The New York Times Book Review
    The publication of Dorothy Allison's Bastard Out of Carolina was a landmark event. The novel's profound portrait of family dynamics in the rural South won the author a National Book Award nomination and launched her into the literary spotlight. Critics have likened Allison to William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, and Harper Lee, naming her the first writer of her generation to dramatize the lives and language of poor whites in the South. Since its appearance, the novel has inspired an award-winning film and has been banned from libraries and classrooms, championed by fans, and defended by critics.
    Greenville County, South Carolina, is a wild, lush place that is home to the Boatwright family-a tight-knit clan of rough-hewn, hard- drinking men who shoot up each other's trucks, and indomitable women who get married young and age too quickly. At the heart of this story is Ruth Anne Boatwright, known simply as Bone, a bastard child who observes the world around her with a mercilessly keen perspective. When her stepfather Daddy Glen, "cold as death, mean as a snake," becomes increasingly more vicious toward her, Bone finds herself caught in a family triangle that tests the loyalty of her mother, Anney-and leads to a final, harrowing encounter from which there can be no turning back.
    Now available in a twentieth anniversary keepsake edition with a new afterword by the author.

  • Anglais Trash

    Allison Dorothy

    Trash, Allison's landmark collection, laid the groundwork for her critically acclaimed Bastard Out of Carolina, the National Book Award finalist that was hailed by The New York Times Book Review as "simply stunning...a wonderful work of fiction by a major talent." In addition to Allison's classic stories, this new edition of Trash features "Stubborn Girls and Mean Stories," an introduction in which Allison discusses the writing of Trash and "Compassion," a never-before-published short story.

    First published in 1988, the award-winning Trash showcases Allison at her most fearlessly honest and startlingly vivid. The limitless scope of human emotion and experience are depicted in stories that give aching and eloquent voice to the terrible wounds we inflict on those closest to us. These are tales of loss and redemption; of shame and forgiveness; of love and abuse and the healing power of storytelling.

    A book that resonates with uncompromising candor and incandescence, Trash is sure to captivate Allison's legion of readers and win her a devoted new following.

  • When Delia Byrd packs up her old Datsun and her daughter Cissy and gets on the Santa Monica Freeway heading south and east, she is leaving everything she has known for ten years: the tinsel glitter of the rock 'n' roll world; her dreams of singing and songwriting; and a life lived on credit cards and whiskey with a man who made promises he couldn't keep. Delia Byrd is going back to Cayro, Georgia, to reclaim her life--and the two daughters she left behind...

    Told in the incantatory voice of one of America's most eloquent storytellers, Cavedweller is a sweeping novel of the human spirit, the lost and hidden recesses of the heart, and the place where violence and redemption intersect.

  • Bastard Out of Carolina, nominated for the 1992 National Book
    Award for fiction, introduced Dorothy Allison as one of the most
    passionate and gifted writers of her generation. Now, in Two or
    Three Things I Know for Sure, she takes a probing look at her
    family's history to give us a lyrical, complex memoir that explores
    how the gossip of one generation can become legends for the next.

    Illustrated with photographs from the author's personal collection,
    Two or Three Things I Know for Sure tells the story of the
    Gibson women -- sisters, cousins, daughters, and aunts -- and the
    men who loved them, often abused them, and, nonetheless, shared
    their destinies. With luminous clarity, Allison explores how desire
    surprises and what power feels like to a young girl as she
    confronts abuse.

    As always, Dorothy Allison is provocative, confrontational, and
    brutally honest. Two or Three Things I Know for Sure, steeped
    in the hard-won wisdom of experience, expresses the strength of
    her unique vision with beauty and eloquence.

empty